Is alluminum cookware : dangerous ?

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For many years, rumors have circulated about aluminum cookware.  Some people have said that using aluminum is toxic, while others claim a link between aluminum cookware and Alzheimer's disease.  So is aluminum cookware bad for your health? 
 
It's true that aluminum is toxic to humans in large concentrations.  However, aluminum is also one of the most common elements in our environment, and it is present in our water, in many foods, and in both prescription and over-the-counter medications.  Aspirin, antacids, and antiperspirants all contain high levels of aluminum.  
 
Furthermore, only a tiny fraction of the aluminum that people consume is absorbed into the body, the rest passing harmlessly through the digestive tract.  Most people consume between 30 and 50 mg of aluminum per day, with no ill effect.
 
Aluminum cookware can react with foods, especially those, such as tomato sauce, which are high in vinegar or acid.  This reaction leaks a trace amount of aluminum into the foods, which are then consumed.  Some types of aluminum cookware are treated so that the aluminum is unable to react with foods.  For example, anodized aluminum uses a chemical bath and an electrical current to bind the aluminum into the pan.
 
Researchers studied the amount of aluminum that could leak into foods by cooking a tomato sauce in an untreated pan.  Even this most potent combination resulted in only 3 mg per serving, less than 10% of the average daily consumption.  This is far too little to pose a health risk.
 
In the 1970s, Canadian researchers released a report that indicated that Alzheimer's patients showed evidence of higher levels of aluminum in the brain than healthy patients.  A link was immediately drawn between the popularity of aluminum cookware (which accounts for more than half of all cookware sold) and increasingly large numbers of Alzheimer's patients.
 
In the years since those initial findings, however, this link has been discounted.  There is no evidence to support the theory that increased consumption of aluminum increases the risk of contracting Alzheimer's.  It's possible that having the disease causes more aluminum to be stored in the brain or that there is no link between aluminum and Alzheimer's at all.  Researchers are still investigating the relationship, but it is quite certain that the culprit behind Alzheimer's is not aluminum cookware.
 
Aluminum cookware is a common choice among consumers because of its excellent heat retention capabilities. With aluminum, pans warm quickly and stay evenly heated for as long as they are in use. Aluminum cookware is often finished with a nonstick coating to ensure food remains unburned.
 
Nonstick cookware is also favored by those who wish to cook with little or no butter or oil. Unfortunately, these types of surfaces also present limitations as to which types of utensils and cleaning products may be used on them.
 
Anodized aluminum is treated and hardened, so that it is less reactive and not prone to scratching as easily as aluminum that has not undergone this process. Anodized aluminum is also easier to maintain, adding an extra oxide film which strengthens the surface of the cookware.
 
Because of aluminum’s superior heat conductivity, it is efficient and a good choice for those who may be concerned about saving energy. Making meals with aluminum pots and pans is a fairly seamless task, since food cooks evenly and quickly. In addition, anodized aluminum’s hard surface helps to prevent food from sticking.
 
Whereas it is recommended you do not store or cook highly acidic foods in aluminum cookware, you needn’t worry about that with anodized aluminum. The specially treated metal prevents harmful reactions that would otherwise cause the metal to enter the foods. In addition, salty foods such as tomato sauce will not pit the bottom of anodized aluminum pots as it would do in a regular aluminum one.
 
While anodized aluminum is certainly not the most inexpensive choice of cookware out there, it is probably the most beneficial. A 10-piece set costs between $300 and $600, depending on which brand you choose. Calphalon is a popular brand, and they offer a variety of choices, ranging between everyday nonstick collections to high-end Calphalon One sets.
 
Because of aluminum’s superior heat conductivity, it is efficient and a good choice for those who may be concerned about saving energy. Making meals with aluminum pots and pans is a fairly seamless task, since food cooks evenly and quickly. In addition, anodized aluminum’s hard surface helps to prevent food from sticking.
 
Conclusion
Aluminum pans do not pose a health risk to their users, even if they are scratched or pitted.  The amount of aluminum that leaks into food is negligible, and far less than that consumed through other methods.
 
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mulyawan has 4 articles online


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Is alluminum cookware : dangerous ?

This article was published on 2012/03/14